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Brainstorm Examples Essay Writing

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AS Photography Statement of Intent and brainstorm examples - A-Level Art - Design - Marked by

AS Photography Statement of Intent and brainstorm examples

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ROBERT BROOKES AS.PHOTOGRAPHY UNIT ARTF1/B Statement of Intent As we are now roughly six months through our course and have now completed our first project, I feel that I now have an understanding of the basic techniques that can be used in SLR photography and have built my confidence in using these skills to get the images I require (e.g. using differential focus (setting a large aperture to create a shorter depth of field, throwing objects outside of that out of focus) to draw the viewers attention to the main subject in a picture, or using shutter exploitation (using either fast shutter speeds e.g. 1/250 of a second to freeze action or slow shutter speeds e.g. 30 seconds to exposed the film for a longer period to blur movement)). I have also learned how to use techniques when printing photographs in the darkroom, using techniques such as dodging (covering an area of a photograph you want to be lighter than the rest of the image) or burning in (exposing certain areas of an image for longer so that they darken) to enhance my final pictures. In the first project I based my work around taking photographs that could show my learning and progression and that demonstrated a working knowledge of simple techniques. . read more.

I want to look at the techniques that they have used (such as composition, use of lighting etc) in creating their photographs and use the knowledge learned to help me with my images. Along with looking at the work of still life photographers I will also look into the work of installation artists such as Tracy Emin and Damien Hirst, who although they may not be photographers do have to look at similar composition and the use of lighting in their work to express their meaning. I believe that understanding exactly what makes good composition will be the key to me producing effective work and so feel that including artists as well as photographers will be of benefit. The reason I have chosen Still Life photography is that I am keen to explore more the use of composition in my images (and the use of my subjects to express thoughts or ideas) and am able to control this more through this medium. Using different subjects for example objects from the natural world (such as leaves or plants) or manmade items (such as cutlery or plates) I hope that I can create photographs with expression and impact. . read more.

Although I know that creating effective still life photographs can be difficult I am very interested in starting this project and will keep a diary as I progress. As with the earlier project I see this as a learning experience and so am hoping that my progression will be shown from my early ideas, through my research and continue up to the printing of my final images. Through my still life work I intend to make (rather than just take) photographs. BRAINSTORM SHEETS Over the next few pages you will find my brainstorm sheets. As this was my first experience with Still Life photography I wanted to ensure that my work had direction and so wrote down my ideas for the work I was about to begin. These included everything from potential subject matter, locations, themes, and techniques. As these were created at the very start of the project they contain every idea I had (no matter whether they ended up being submitted as part of my final work or not). I have split these into Still Life - General thoughts, Subject - Ideas for items in the photographs and finally Themes - ideas for the type of message I want my photographs to express. Rob Brookes - Photography AS - ARTF1/B . read more.

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PPT - Timed Essay Writing PowerPoint Presentation

Timed Essay Writing PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Released SAT prompt from 10/2012
  • Think carefully about the issue presented in the following excerpt and the assignment below.

  • The idea of caring about only the people of one's own country seems outdated. Some people still defend this attitude, claiming that if we are going to expend resources to help people, we should help those of our own country first. But national boundaries are meaningless lines that shift over time. There is no reason why a citizen of one country should not feel just as responsible for the well-being of people in other countries as for the well-being of those in his or her own country.

  • Assignment: Should we care just as much about people in other countries as we do about people in our own country? Plan and write an essay in which you develop your point of view on this issue. Support your position with reasoning and examples taken from your reading, studies, experience, or observations.

    Released Essay Prompt from 10/2012
    • Think carefully about the issue presented in the following excerpt and the assignment below.
  • Some say that high achievers—people who reach their ambitious goals because of their determination and skills—always get ahead at the expense of others. When one political candidate is elected, others are defeated; when someone wins in any kind of competitive event, others lose. But this view of achievers is too negative. By improving the world around them and providing an example for all to follow, achievers benefit others as well as themselves.

  • Assignment: Do the actions of high achievers benefit all people? Plan and write an essay in which you develop your point of view on this issue. Support your position with reasoning and examples taken from your reading, studies, experience, or observations.

    Released prompt #3
    • Think carefully about the issue presented in the following excerpt and the assignment below.
  • People tend to consider the past unimportant. After all, why waste time dwelling on what has already happened? There is no way to go back and change events or their outcomes. But this way of thinking is wrong. People are too focused on the present; they should pay more and closer attention to past events. The lessons learned from examining the past are much more valuable than any lessons that people can learn from the present.

  • Assignment: Do people learn more from examining events in the past than from focusing only on the present? Plan and write an essay in which you develop your point of view on this issue. Support your position with reasoning and examples taken from your reading, studies, experience, or observations.

  • How to Write an Example Essay

    How to Write an Example Essay

    Writing an essay

    The example essay is one of the most basic essays in academic writing, but can be extremely difficult if you've never written one or do not know what to write about. Example essays focus on one main idea which you prove with several specific, convincing examples. If you're stuck on how to write an example essay, you can follow a few simple steps to dig yourself out of the rut and write an example essay that you can be proud of.

    Review your example essay assignment sheet. List the criteria of the essay on a separate sheet of paper. Make note of anything that confuses you and ask your professor for clarification.

    Brainstorm example essay topics. List three to five topics that you are interested in or would like to write about. Brainstorm ideas for what you're going to write if the assignment is specifically about one topic. Make a sub-list for each topic that you could write about.

    Write a thesis statement for each topic. A thesis statement is a single sentence that you will argue in your paper. For example, if you were to write on the topic of dog training, you could have a thesis statement such as "Dogs listen better to trainers who use positive rewards instead of scolding and hitting."

    Write down three to five examples to prove your thesis statement for each topic. Use the "SEE" model as a formula for each example. "S" stands for "statement" and is a reiteration of what you're trying to prove. For example, your statement could be that a dog trainer who rewards a dog for relieving itself outside sees faster and more permanent results than a trainer who scolds a dog for doing it inside. The first "E" stands for "example" and is the proof that you need to back up what you say in your statement. Provide specific examples to prove your statement. The last "E" stands for "Explanation" and is used to reiterate how your example ties into the thesis. For example, you might explain that because the first trainer used positive rewards, he saw better results than the trainer who scolded the dog. Therefore, trainers should use positive rewards when potty training a dog.

    Choose the topic you most want to write about. Pick the topic that is most interesting and that has enough clear and convincing examples to prove your point.

    Sit down and write your example essay. Write an introductory paragraph that gives background information into your topic and draws the reader into the essay. Write your body paragraphs using the "SEE" model examples you came up with. Write your conclusion by tying in all of the examples and restating how the examples relate to your thesis.

    Edit your example essay. Read back through your essay and make sure that all of your examples prove your point adequately. Have a friend read your essay and ask her what she thinks could be explained more clearly.

    Revise your example essay. Print a copy of the essay, and use a pen to go through and correct any grammar or mechanical errors that you find.

    IELTS Energy: Writing Task 2- How to Brainstorm and Organize Ideas

    On IELTS Writing Task 2 do you struggle to find ideas?

    Do you know where to put your ideas when you come up with them?

    Today we’ll show you how to brainstorm for Writing Task 2 and how to organize your ideas into your paragraphs in Writing Task 2.

    How to brainstorm your ideas for IELTS Writing Task 2:

    • Write down anything that comes to mind
    • Go beyond the 2nd, 3rd idea- write down 4, 5, 6 ideas
    • Don’t stop brainstorming until you get an interesting angle, concept, point
    • Draw two columns, agree and disagree and write down everything you can think of
    • Don’t over-complicate it by trying to be too specific, it can be broad such as “Many people agree with X for the following reasons.”

    How to organize your ideas:

    • Go back and circle the best ideas and then you are ready to write
    • In the body paragraph, the first sentence needs to have the topic sentence
    • In the next sentences, use more complicated sentences and build out your idea
    • Journal every day- close your eyes, point to something in the newspaper, take ten minutes to write about that topic

    Let us know in the comments below .

    Photo Credit: http://bit.ly/1cf6ntb

    How to be successful for IELTS Writing Task 2 :
    1) brainstorm – write all your ideas which come to your mind
    2) organize them into 4 paragraphs – introduction. 2 body paragraphs ( examples / details ) ,
    and conclusion
    3) divide them into two sections – agree and disagree with clear / strong reasons. and with beginning topic sentence in each body part
    4) Use more complicated or complex sentences as you build out your points
    5) Go back to check spelling. grammar. and structure for any mistakes. and correct them

    How to be successful for IELTS Writing Task 2 :
    1) brainstorm – write all your ideas which come to your mind
    2) organize them into 4 paragraphs – introduction. 2 body paragraphs ( examples / details ) ,
    and conclusion
    3) divide them into two sections – agree and disagree with clear / strong reasons. and with beginning topic sentence in each body part
    4) Use more complicated or complex sentences as you build out your points
    5) Go back to check spelling. grammar. and structure for any mistakes. and correct them

    1) Brainstorms all your ideas like a pool of ideas
    2) Select the best ideas to categorise them into “AGREE” and “DISAGREE”
    3) Put your ideas in step 2) in two body paragraphs separately
    4) Body paragraph structure: simple and general topic sentence –> explanation to build up ideas using complex sentence –> examples

    Tips:
    1) Journal ideas every day (10 min)
    2) Extract fresh and some all-purpose ideas

    The Approaching Storm

    The Approaching Storm

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    I see lightning flashing across the plain, starting fires every once in a while, immediately being extinguished by the rain. As I look across the vast expanse of land from my perch on my horse, I see a tornado spinning round and round. Then all of a sudden, I see an invisible barrier racing towards me, flattening all the grass and shrubs as it sweeps its way across the plain, like a shockwave. About a minute before it hits me, I realize that, with a start, that it is a GIGANTIC gust of wind. I brace myself, just waiting for the wind to hit me, trapped like a cornered animal huddling and cowering, waiting for the inevitable. Suddenly it hits me and my steed, almost knocking me from the saddle. I lift my eyes to the sky and see, ever growing closer, a huge, monstrous thunderhead. If I embellish the cloud, I can just imagine a great cathedral, with billowing flags, and stone gargoyles staring mincingly down at me.

    Also I made out columns and arches and doors. The air around me is heavy, still, like a colossal blanket, struggling to smother me. I hear a sound like a train rolling along the tracks, and unfortunately just as loud. Well I guess I had better go back home to report the storm to my family and, most likely, go down to the storm cellar, waiting for the approaching storm to slowly pass.

    NOTE: This is a good English paper because it has lots of details and it has very good word usage.

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