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NSWC Software for Mechanical Reliability Prediction from ITEM Software

NSWC
ITEM ToolKit Module

NSWC Mechanical Reliability Prediction
US Navy Standard NSWC 11 (98/LE1, 06/LE10)

The NSWC module of ITEM ToolKit uses a series of models for various categories of mechanical components to predict failure rates based on temperature, stresses, flow rates and various other parameters. It provides models for various types of mechanical devices including actuators, springs, bearings, seals, electric motors, compressors, pumps, brakes and clutches and many more. NSWC is currently the only one of its kind.

Due to the wide range of failure rates that occur in apparently similar components, the NSWC Mechanical Prediction module does not rely on failure rate data alone. It also accounts for material properties, operating environment, and critical failure modes at the component level.

The NSWC 11 (98/LE1, 06/LE10) Standard is a commonly used model for mechanical components. Standard procedures for predicting the reliability of mechanical components, sub-systems and systems are defined in the Naval Surface Warfare Center Handbook of Reliability Prediction Procedures for Mechanical Equipment.

The "Handbook of Reliability Prediction Procedures for Mechanical Equipment" contains twenty-three chapters of information with equations, engineering tables and procedures for estimating the reliability of a mechanical design for the intended operating environment. Handbook procedures are used to determine the reliability of fundamental components such as springs, bearings, seals and gaskets. These component applications are then expanded to subassemblies such as valves, actuators and pumps and then to the system level. Equations in the Handbook include parameters for material properties, operating conditions and stress levels at each equipment indenture level providing a full reliability, maintainability and availability analysis at the system, assembly and component indenture levels.

The handbook covers the following types of mechanical components:

  • Seals and Gaskets
  • Springs
  • Solenoids
  • Valve Assemblies
  • Bearings
  • Gears and Splines
  • Actuators
  • Pumps
  • Filters
  • Brakes and Clutches
  • Compressors
  • Electric Motors
  • Accumulators
  • Threaded Fasteners
  • Mechanical Couplings
  • Slider-Crank Mechanisms
  • Sensors and Transducers
  • Shafts
  • Belt Drives
  • Fluid Conductors
  • Miscellaneous Parts
Download Demonstration

To download a free demonstration of our NSWC software click here .

Screen shots | click to enlarge

Powerful and user friendly NSWC 11 mechanical reliability prediction software

Also inlcudes NSWC 98/LE1 and NSWC 06/LE10

Linked Block facility reduces repetitive data entry

Redundancy modeling including hot standby

Multi systems within the same project

Extensive component libraries to reduce entry time

Multi-document interface allows easy transfer of data

Powerful charting facilties

Combine prediction methods for complex analysis

Optimize designs to meet targeted goals

Select components with regard to reliability and cost savings

Other articles

Reliability Prediction Software for Mechanical Components Based on NSWC Standard

NSWC Mechanical Reliability Prediction

The NSWC module of ITEM ToolKit uses a series of models for various categories of mechanical components to predict failure rates based on temperature, stresses, flow rates and various other parameters. It provides models for various types of mechanical devices including actuators, springs, bearings, seals, electric motors, compressors, pumps, brakes and clutches and many more. NSWC is currently the only one of its kind.

Due to the wide range of failure rates that occur in apparently similar components, the NSWC Mechanical Prediction module does not rely on failure rate data alone. It also accounts for material properties, operating environment, and critical failure modes at the component level.

The NSWC 11 (98/LE1, 06/LE1) Standard is a commonly used model for mechanical components. Standard procedures for predicting the reliability of mechanical components, sub-systems and systems are defined in the Naval Surface Warfare Center Handbook of Reliability Prediction Procedures for Mechanical Equipment.

The "Handbook of Reliability Prediction Procedures for Mechanical Equipment" contains twenty-three chapters of information with equations, engineering tables and procedures for estimating the reliability of a mechanical design for the intended operating environment. Handbook procedures are used to determine the reliability of fundamental components such as springs, bearings, seals and gaskets. These component applications are then expanded to subassemblies such as valves, actuators and pumps and then to the system level. Equations in the Handbook include parameters for material properties, operating conditions and stress levels at each equipment indenture level providing a full reliability, maintainability and availability analysis at the system, assembly and component indenture levels.

The handbook covers the following types of mechanical components:

  • Seals and Gaskets
  • Springs
  • Solenoids
  • Valve Assemblies
  • Bearings
  • Gears and Splines
  • Actuators
  • Pumps
  • Filters
  • Brakes and Clutches
  • Compressors
  • Electric Motors
  • Accumulators
  • Threaded Fasteners
  • Mechanical Couplings
  • Slider-Crank Mechanisms
  • Sensors and Transducers
  • Shafts
  • Belt Drives
  • Fluid Conductors
  • Miscellaneous Parts
  • Powerful and user friendly NSWC 11 mechanical reliability prediction software
  • Also includes NSWC 98/LE1 and 06/LE10 standards
  • Linked Block facility reduces repetitive data entry
  • Redundancy modeling including hot standby
  • Multi systems within the same project
  • Extensive component libraries to reduce entry time
  • Multi-document interface allows easy transfer of data
  • Powerful charting facilties
  • Combine prediction methods for complex analysis
  • Optimize designs to meet targeted goals
  • Select components with regard to reliability and cost savings

ITEM ToolKit contains five modules for performing reliability prediction (MTBF) analysis. These modules conform to MIL-HDBK-217 F Notice 2, Telcordia (Bellcore) TR-332 and SR-332, IEC 62380 (RDF 2000), China 299B GJB/z 299B (electronics) and NSWC 06 (mechanical) and share many common features and capabilities.

Each reliability prediction module is designed to analyse and calculate component, sub system and system failure rates, including Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF), in accordance with the appropriate standard. After the analysis is complete, ITEM ToolKit's integrated environment comes into its own with powerful conversion facilities for transferring data to other modules of the program. For example, transfer your MIL-217 project data to FMECA or your Telcordia project to RBD. These powerful facilities transfer as much of the available information as possible, saving you valuable time and effort.

ITEM ToolKit's Multi Document Interface allows several projects or libraries to open at the same time. This valuable feature comes in especially handy when it is necessary to transfer data from one project (or library) to another.

Users can construct hierarchical breakdowns of systems with no restrictions on block numbers or levels of indenture. As new sub blocks and components are added, ITEM ToolKit automatically recalculates all dependent failure rates to take account of new information.

Powerful global editing facilities are available for performing "what if" evaluations. These facilities enable you to experiment with temperature, environmental and stress settings and see how your system performance will vary.

VSolvit Signs CRADA with NSWC PHD, First for Naval Installation

VSolvit Signs CRADA with NSWC PHD, First for Naval Installation

The signing of this CRADA has the power to transform our organization. I’m confident that the positives that come out of this agreement will benefit the warfighter, NSWC PHD and our sponsors.-CAPT Eric Ver Hage, NSWC PHD commanding officer

Port Hueneme, CA (PRWEB) December 17, 2014

Award winning, Ventura, CA based Information Technology services provider VSolvit (pronounced “We Solve it”) signed a Navy Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Naval Surface Warfare Center, Port Hueneme Division (NSWC PHD) to accelerate the development of an innovative cyber security concept, a first for NSWC PHD. The agreement, which involves VSolvit’s Cyber Intelligent Assessment Risk Management Systems (Ci-ARMS), was jointly signed by CAPT Eric Ver Hage, NSWC PHD’s commanding officer and Michael Poole, VSolvit’s Director of West Coast Operations December 1, 2014. “The VSolvit team is delighted and looking forward to working with NSWC PHD to further our combined capabilities in Cybersecurity Risk Assessment and support our warfighter. This CRADA represents an important extension of our capabilities beyond the historical excellence in Business Intelligence, Data Warehousing, and GIS application development. Payal Kamdar, our CEO sends her thanks to NSWC PHD, CAPT Ver Hage and Greg Wakatsuki for bringing this CRADA to fruition.” said Poole.

A CRADA is an agreement between one or more Federal Labs and one or more non-Federal parties to conduct mutually beneficial research and development to create products that benefit the government, in this case the Fleet. Ver Hage shared his enthusiasm about the event, “The signing of this CRADA has the power to transform our organization. I’m confident that the positives that come out of this agreement will benefit the warfighter, NSWC PHD and our sponsors. This CRADA allows us to be innovative and collaborative and offers an opportunity to grow the local economy. With this agreement, we’re not going to our sponsors for funding but rather we’re pursuing a solution that will strengthen our brand.”

“As an outgrowth of our mission to facilitate technology transfers with third parties, the signing of this CRADA with VSolvit is memorable. With a CRADA, we have the unique ability to collaborate with outside companies in the research and development of a product and then we let the Navy test drive the new product to determine whether or not it meets the demanding needs of the Fleet.” said Greg Wakatsuki, NSWC PHD’s Office of Research and Technology Applications.

As a result of its successful history working with NSWC PHD, VSolvit was chosen as a cooperative research partner to assist in developing a cyber intelligence assessment system that would help the Navy assess cyber vulnerabilities aboard ships. With ever increasing cyber security threats to defense systems, the military has taken a proactive approach to tackle these challenges. The purpose of this CRADA reinforces VADM William H. Hilarides, NAVSEA commander’s focus on improving cybersecurity across the Fleet. “Combining the resources of VSolvit and NSWC PHD will allow us to move more quickly into concept development and feasibility to determine if a jointly developed product can determine if a ship has cyber vulnerabilities and how to resolve them,” Wakatsuki said. “This type of collaboration has the ability to provide a dramatically improved level of cyber assessment and risk management.”

The objective of Ci-ARMS is to integrate existing cyber security sensors and related cyber security operational processes into an end-to-end enterprise system.Ci-ARMS provides a holistic view of infrastructures, data centers, networks, and systems (combined assets) by leveraging existing security sensor systems.

About NSWC PD-
NSWC Port Hueneme Division is a field activity of Naval Sea Systems command and provides the United states Navy global fleet with weapon system in-service engineering, logistics,and test and evaluation. NSWC Port Hueneme is located at naval Base ventura county, Calif. where it employs more than 1,900 personnel.

About VSolvit-
VSolvit (pronounced: "We.Solve.it") is an award-winning SBA certified 8(a)/Small Disadvantaged Business, HUBZone, and 8(m)/Economically Disadvantaged Woman owned, technology services provider that specializes in Cybersecurity, Business Intelligence (BI) systems, Data Warehousing (DW), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Custom Application Development, Health Analytics, Engineering Services and Project/Program Management.

VSolvit’s customer list includes the Department of Defense (DOD), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and multiple commercial organizations. VSolvit has been selected to support high profile initiatives including launched application from The White House, and has been recognized for its innovation and outstanding delivery. VSolvit has grown from a 2 person company (2006) to over 200 people, contributing to the local economy without outsourcing a single job. Some of the awards/key milestones include:

(2014) Winning 5 Yr - $500M Ceiling Single Award DFAD Contract, Cybersecurity CRADA, CMMI-DEV Level 3, Goldman Sachs 100 Most Intriguing Entrepreneurs, Innovation Through Technology Business of the Year, ISO 9001:2008 certification
(2013) 5 Yr - $53M Single Award NAVFAC EBS Contract, Health Mapping Portal Launch
(2012) SBA Region IX SBA Minority Business Person of the Year
(2011) USDA Woman Owned Business of the Year

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Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Crane Division Indiana

Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Crane Division

Is military base in Indiana

NSWC Crane Division Facts

Located a few miles from Bloomington, the Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane Division Base is the third largest Naval Base in the world. It is named after William M. Crane and covers about 259 square kilometers of Lake Greenwood. Though parts of the Base extend into Lawrence and Greene Counties, the larger portion is in Martin County. It was originally built to serve as Naval Ammunition Depot and also to produce, test and store ordnance under the Bureau of ordnance to implement the Supplemental Defense Appropriation Act. The bureau of weapons expanded its operations in Crane as weapons became more sophisticated in the 1950s to respond to the sophistication. Crane was placed under the Naval Sea Systems command and renamed the Naval Weapons Support Center, which was a better description of their operations. The Crane Army Ammunition Activity was later formed as a tenant command to deal with the manufacture and storage of ammunition at the Base.

Crane first produced batteries, electronic components and rotating components. Among the services it offered were repair, overhaul, failure analysis and standard hardware design and engineering. Now world renowned ordnance roots, crane is recognized for its sophisticated and modern weaponry and technical products. The center also conducts a lot of research into weapons development and evaluation. They also regulate weapon acquisition and combat system security. Crane is also into fleet maintenance and modernization. They also develop and maintain power systems, strategic systems, small arms and surface electronic systems. The Base also develops marine systems such as undersea warfare systems. Crane developed the system the United States Army for the yet-to-come DD(X) class of destroyer and the Littoral Combat Ship. A groove of trees, also known as the Constitution Grove at the base is harvested for the White Oak wood for the United States Constitution. The Center also oversees strategic missions.

About Richard Wilson

Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Corona Division

Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Corona Division

The Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Corona Division - a Naval Sea Systems Command activity, is the Navy's only independent analysis and assessment center. The mission of the NSWC Corona Division is to "Gauge the warfighting capacity of ships and aircraft, from unit to battlegroup level, by assessing the suitability of design, the performance of weapons and equipment, and the adequacy of training." In order to carry out this mission, NSWC Corona Division possesses a number of unique capabilities. Foremost among these is the Warfare Assessment Laboratory - the cornerstone of an integrated approach to warfare assessment and the focal point of internal and external interconnectivity.

NSWC Corona Division is comprised of three Centers of Excellence, four departments, and more than 950 scientists and engineers, 700 contractors, and one of the Navy's largest scientific and engineering computer operations. More than 180 critical programs are assigned to the Center with about $180 million dollars of annual expenditures.

The site of the NSWC Corona Division was once a playground for the rich and famous. A 700-acre luxury resort once operated here in Norco, built by Rex Clark in 1928. Frequented by silent-screen stars, the complex sported a gambling casino, golf course, 55 acre lake, a hot sulfur spring spa, an airport, and a magnificent, 5-story hotel. Sitting atop a knoll, the hotel had a commanding view of Lake Norconian and the surrounding countryside. With the stock market crash of 1929, the resort plunged into a 12-year decline culminating in Clark agreeing to sell the complex to the Navy for 1.6 million dollars December 6th, 1941, one day before the attack on Pearl Harbor.

The Navy quickly began to convert the complex into a hospital. Behind the ornate facade of the main building, murals were removed from the walls, chandeliers were taken down, furniture was stored, draperies and Persian rugs were removed, and soon the elegant hotel was turned into an aseptic, strictly functional hospital. Even the sulfur baths were converted to functional hydrotherapy mineral baths. By 1944, there were 100 officers, 184 nurses, and 1200 corpsmen at the hospital, and that year alone, they cared for almost 12,000 patients.

Under the direction of Dr. Robert D. Huntoon, most of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Missile Development Division began to move to the west coast and Unit II was formally designated as the NBS Corona Laboratories. Under Dr. Huntoon's leadership, the organization rapidly expanded to 250 scientists, technicians, and necessary support personnel. This staff continued to concentrate on missiles and improving methods of guiding and fusing them.

In 1952, there occurred a key event in the evolution of the NSWC Corona Division. By that year, the Navy's Terrier guided missile had completed development and was considered ready for full-scale shipboard firing tests. Recognizing the need for accurate and objective evaluation of these firings, the Navy assigned responsibility for this task to the government group whose work on guided missiles it had been sponsoring for more than a decade-the NBS Corona Laboratories.

By 1953, the NBS Corona laboratories were in full operation with a staff of more than 400. On 24 July of that year, following a decision that weapons research and development were more properly a function of the military than NBS, the Secretary of Defense, and the Secretary of Commerce jointly announced plans to transfer seventeen NBS technical divisions to the Department of Defense. As part of that transfer, the NBS activity at Corona was transferred to the Department of the Navy, redesignated the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, Corona (NOLC) and assigned to the Bureau of Ordnance, thus becoming an official part of the Bureau it had served since 1941.

The Naval Warfare Assessment Division of the Naval Ordnance Center dedicated a new 48,000 square-foot Warfare Assessment building April 6th, 1994. The $9,425,532 Warfare Assessment Laboratory provides a consolidated secure facility to analyze fleet readiness and capability during world-wide multi-service training exercises.

Secretary of Defense Recommendation: Close Naval Support Activity Corona, CA. Relocate Naval Surface Warfare Center Division Corona, CA, to Naval Base Ventura County (Naval Air Station Point Mugu), CA.

Secretary of Defense Justification: The Naval Surface Warfare Center Division Corona performs three required missions for Department of the Navy (Independent Assessment Capability, Metrology and Calibration Laboratories, and Tactical Aircrew Combat Training System Ranges). It was analyzed under 11 Research, Development & Acquisition, and Test & Evaluation functions (Air Platforms Development & Acquisition; Air Platforms Test & Evaluation; Ground Vehicles Test and Evaluation; Information Systems Technology Development & Acquisition; Information Systems Technology Test & Evaluation; Sea Vehicles Development & Acquisition; Sea Vehicles Test & Evaluation; Sensors, Electronics, and Electronic Warfare Development & Acquisition; Sensors, Electronics, and Electronic Warfare Test & Evaluation; Weapons Technology Development & Acquisition; and Weapons Technology Test & Evaluation). In each functional area, Naval Surface Warfare Center Division Corona's quantitative military value scores fell in the bottom half of facilities performing the same function and thus were reviewed for relocation and/or consolidation with like functions. The Department of the Navy determined it would lose a critical capability if the 11 functions were relocated to a variety of locations, since this would fracture the full - spectrum warfare center and independent assessment capability. Considering the overall military value and the fact that Naval Support Activity Corona was a single function facility, the Department reviewed the possibility of relocating the Naval Surface Warfare Center functions to a multi-functional location with the capability to host these functions. Relocation of Naval Surface Warfare Center Division Corona to Naval Air Station Point Mugu collocates it with other Research, Development & Acquisition, and Test & Evaluation activities and with fleet assets at Naval Air Station Point Mugu. This consolidation of space will provide a more efficient organization with greater synergies and increased effectiveness.

Relocation of Naval Surface Warfare Center Division Corona Research, Development & Acquisition, and Test & Evaluation functions to Naval Air Station Point Mugu removes the primary mission from Naval Support Activity Corona and eliminates or moves the entirety of the workforce at Naval Support Activity Corona except for those personnel associated with the base operations support function. As a result, retention of Naval Support Activity Corona is no longer necessary.

The total estimated one-time cost to the Department of Defense to implement this recommendation would be $80.2M. The net of all costs and savings to the Department during the implementation period would be a cost of $65.5M. Annual recurring savings to the Department after implementation are $6.0M with a payback expected in 15 years. The net present value of the costs and savings to the Department over 20 years would be a savings of $0.4M. Assuming no economic recovery, DoD estimated that this recommendation could result in a maximum potential reduction of 1,796 jobs (892 direct jobs and 904 indirect jobs) over the 2006-2011 period in the Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA, Metropolitan Statistical Area, which would be 0.1 percent of economic area employment.

Community Concerns: Community advocates focused on three primary issues. First, DoD's proposal would result in a brain drain, with fewer than 20 percent of existing employees likely to move. As evidence, they cited: (a) the large percentage of retirement eligible employees, (b) recent hiring almost exclusively from nearby universities, (c) Ventura County housing costs, twice those near Norco/Corona, and (d) projected three-to-six fold increases in Naval Base Ventura County area property taxes. Second, NSA's mission critical independence would be threatened by status as a tenant or subordinate command. Third, the community believes DoD's proposal will cost significantly more than projected, making an already thin net present value of savings ($360,000 after 20 years and one-time costs of $80.2 million) even less worthwhile. Last, DoD's figures do not include the cost of training about 650 new employees at a cost in excess of $70K per employee.

Commission Findings: The Commission carefully considered all of the concerns voiced by the community, as well as the justification provided by the Secretary of Defense. The Commission's analysis found that from a cost perspective, the proposed move was not advisable because even if the DoD estimates were correct, the $360,000 in anticipated savings over a 20-year period were minuscule in comparison to the plan's likely risks and implementation challenges. Furthermore, the Commission shared community concerns regarding the likelihood that a large percentage of the employees were unlikely to make the proposed move, creating program-related disruptions and increasing cost. Finally, the Commission found substantial issues regarding the feasibility of constructing the needed specialized facilities, including the fact that a major and respected contractor estimate for construction of two key buildings was $40 million more than DoD's military construction projections.

Commission Recommendations: The Commission found that the Secretary of Defense deviated substantially from final selection criteria 1 and 4, and the Force Structure Plan. Therefore, the Commission has rejected the recommendation of the Secretary.